Zulu (1964 film)

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Zulu is a 1964 British epic war film depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift between the British Army and the Zulus in January 1879, during the Anglo-Zulu War.wikipedia
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Michael Caine

Sir Michael Caine Sir Michael CaineAlfred
The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
He made his breakthrough in the 1960s with starring roles in British films, including Zulu (1964), The Ipcress File (1965), Alfie (1966), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, The Italian Job (1969), and Battle of Britain (1969).

James Booth

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
He is probably best known for his role as Private Henry Hook in Zulu.

Ulla Jacobsson

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
Ulla Jacobsson (23 May 1929 – 20 August 1982) was a Swedish actress who is best known for playing the only female speaking role in the film Zulu (1964).

Nigel Green

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
Because of his strapping build, commanding height (6 feet 4 inches) and regimental demeanour he would often be found playing military types and men of action in such classic 1960s films as Jason and the Argonauts, Zulu, Tobruk and The Ipcress File.

Ivor Emmanuel

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
He is probably best remembered, however, for his appearance as "Private Owen" in the 1964 film Zulu, in which his character rallies outnumbered British soldiers by leading them in the stirring Welsh battle hymn "Men of Harlech" to counter the Zulu war chants.

Mangosuthu Buthelezi

Gatsha ButheleziButheleziChief Mangosuthu Buthelezi
Future South African political leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi played Zulu King Cetshwayo kaMpande, his great grandfather.
In 1964, he played King Cetshwayo kaMpande (his own maternal great-grandfather) in the film Zulu.

John Chard

ChardJohn Rouse Merriott ChardLieut John Chard VC
Receiving news of Isandhlwana from the Natal Native Contingent Commander Adendorff, who warns that an army of 4,000 Zulu warriors is advancing to the British position, Lieutenant John Chard (Stanley Baker) of the Royal Engineers assumes command of the small British detachment.
The battle was recreated in the film Zulu in which Chard was portrayed by Stanley Baker.

Gonville Bromhead

Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead (Michael Caine), an infantry officer, is rather put out to find himself subordinate to an engineer due to the latter's slightly earlier commission.
Bromhead was portrayed by Michael Caine in the film Zulu, which depicted the battle.

Cy Endfield

Cyril EndfieldCy Raker EndfieldCyril R. Endfield
The film was directed by American screenwriter Cy Endfield and produced by Stanley Baker and Endfield, with Joseph E. Levine as executive producer.
His best remembered film is Zulu (1964).

Glynn Edwards

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
In 1964 Edwards chose to take the role of Corporal Allen in Cy Endfield's film Zulu over a part in Littlewood's stage show Oh! What a Lovely War.

Paul Daneman

The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
His film credits included Time Without Pity (1957), Zulu (1964), How I Won the War (1967) and Oh! What a Lovely War (1969).

Patrick Magee (actor)

Patrick Magee
The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
He also appeared as Surgeon-Major Reynolds in Zulu (1964), Séance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), Anzio (1968), and in the film versions of Marat/Sade (1967; as de Sade) and The Birthday Party (1968).

Stanley Baker

Sir Stanley Baker
The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee. The film was directed by American screenwriter Cy Endfield and produced by Stanley Baker and Endfield, with Joseph E. Levine as executive producer.
While making Sodom and Gomorrah Baker struck up a relationship with that film's producer, Joseph E. Levine which enabled him to raise the $3 million budget for Zulu (1964), directed by Endfield, shot partly on location in South Africa.

Men of Harlech

John Guard lyricsMarch of the Men of HarlechThe March of the Men of Harlech
The next morning, the Zulus approach to within several hundred yards and begin singing a war chant; the British respond by singing "Men of Harlech".
The song gained international recognition when it was featured in the 1941 movie How Green Was My Valley and the 1964 film Zulu.

Neil McCarthy (actor)

Neil McCarthy
Neil McCarthy as Private Thomas, a former Welsh farmer who becomes friends with Private Owen
McCarthy's film credits include memorable roles as a Welsh soldier in Zulu (1964), as Sergeant Jock McPherson in Where Eagles Dare (1968), as Gates in The Ruffians (1973), as the villain Calibos in Clash of the Titans (1981) and as a robber in Time Bandits (1981).

Dickie Owen

Dickie Owen as Corporal Christian Schiess, a hospitalised Swiss corporal in the Natal Native Contingent
He was known for his roles in Zulu, The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb and The Mummy's Shroud.

Harvey Hall (actor)

Harvey Hall
Harvey Hall as Sick man
He appeared in many British television series and films, which include Danger Man, Z-Cars, The Masque of the Red Death, Zulu, No Hiding Place, The Avengers, Out of the Unknown, The Champions, The Vampire Lovers, Lust for a Vampire and others.

Peter Gill (playwright)

Peter Gill
Peter Gill as Private 612 John Williams, a member of the company choir who is partnered with Private Hook in defending the hospital

Jack Hawkins

his namesakeJack (John Edward) Hawkins
The film stars Stanley Baker and introduces Michael Caine, in his first major role, with a supporting cast that includes Jack Hawkins, Ulla Jacobsson, James Booth, Nigel Green, Paul Daneman, Glynn Edwards, Ivor Emmanuel and Patrick Magee.
Rampage (1963) was less distinguished but Zulu (1964) gave him a good role as a cowardly priest; it was however clearly a support part and Hawkins' days as a star seemed to be over.

John Prebble

Prebble, John
The screenplay is by John Prebble and Endfield, based on an article by Prebble, a historical writer.
He wrote the article entitled "Slaughter in the Sun" for the magazine Lilliput in 1958, on which the film Zulu (1964) was based, and co-wrote the screenplay with the director, Cy Endfield.

Joseph E. Levine

Joseph E. Levine ProductionsJoseph Levine
The film was directed by American screenwriter Cy Endfield and produced by Stanley Baker and Endfield, with Joseph E. Levine as executive producer.
Zulu (1964)

Zulu Dawn

The uniforms of the Natal Native Contingent are inaccurate: NNC troops were not issued with European-style clothes. Only their European officers wore makeshift uniforms. The rank and file wore traditional tribal garb topped by a red rag worn around the forehead (as correctly depicted in the prequel Zulu Dawn). The story of their desertion is true. However, as Witt had already left, he was not responsible for their departure. They left of their own accord, with Captain Stephenson and his European NCOs. These deserters were fired at as they left and one of their NCOs, Corporal Anderson, was killed. Stephenson was later convicted of desertion at a court-martial and dismissed from the army.
Zulu Dawn is a prequel to Zulu, released in 1964, which depicts the historical Battle of Rorke's Drift later the same day, and was co-written and directed by Cy Endfield.

Cetshwayo kaMpande

CetshwayoCetewayoKing Cetshwayo
Future South African political leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi played Zulu King Cetshwayo kaMpande, his great grandfather.
In the 1964 film Zulu, he was played by Mangosuthu Buthelezi, his own great-grandson and the future leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party.

Gert van den Bergh

Gert van den Bergh as Lieutenant Josef Adendorff, an Afrikaner officer serving with the Natal Native Contingent and a survivor of the battle at Isandhlwana
Zulu (1964) - Lieutenant Josef Adendorff

Henry Hook (VC)

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Private Henry Hook (James Booth) takes charge and successfully leads the patients to safety.
In the film Zulu, Hook is depicted as an insubordinate malingerer placed under arrest in the hospital, only to come good during the battle.