July 17, 1981: 114 killed in Hyatt Regency Hotel collapse in Kansas City
August 10, 1913: Bucharest treaty ends Second Balkan War
July 27, 1981: Microsoft buys the secret to its success
August 20, 1913: Stainless steel invented by British metallurgist Harry Brearley (pictured, the stainless steel plaque honoring him)
July 17, 1981: Nissan announces phasing out of Datsun trademark
August 23, 1913: The Little Mermaid statue assembled in Copenhagen
Presidents Mitterrand and Reagan
August 13, 1913: Canadian arctic ship Karluk trapped in ice
John Walsh
August 2, 1913: Mortal men reach the summit of Mount Olympus, home of the Greek gods
Juan Vicente Gómez, President of Venezuela.
Acting New York Governor Martin H. Glynn.
Impeached Governor William Sulzer.
P. N. Nesterov
Pilgrim monument
Émile Ollivier
Unlucky pilot Harry Hawker.
Unidentified accident victim for two weeks, U.S. Congressman Timothy Sullivan.

The following events occurred in July 1981:

- July 1981

Massachusetts angler Charles Church caught a five foot long, 73 pound striped bass, the largest up to that time. Church's record would stand for almost 58 years as the mark that "remained the goal of every striper fisherman", until July 17, 1981, when Captain Bob Roschetta would reel in a 76-pound bass.

- August 1913
During winter dormancy, plant metabolism comes to a virtual standstill, due in part to low temperatures that slow chemical activity.
Production of new individuals along a leaf margin of the miracle leaf plant (Kalanchoe pinnata). The small plant in front is about 1 cm (0.4 in) tall. The concept of "individual" is obviously stretched by this asexual reproductive process.
Annual life cycle of sympodially growing orchids with dormancy after completion of new growth/pseudobulb, e.g., Miltonia, or Odontoglossum
Annual life cycle of sympodially growing orchids with dormancy after blooming, e.g., Cycnoches ventricosum, Dendrobium nobile, or Laelia

In embryonic diapause, the embryonic blastocyst does not immediately implant in the uterus after sexual reproduction has created the zygote, but rather remains in a state of dormancy.

- Embryonic diapause

Diapause is common in insects, allowing them to suspend development between autumn and spring, and in mammals such as the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus, the only ungulate with embryonic diapause), in which a delay in attachment of the embryo to the uterine lining ensures that offspring are born in spring, when conditions are most favorable.

- Dormancy
A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food web.
The side of a tide pool showing sea stars (Dermasterias), sea anemones (Anthopleura) and sea sponges in Santa Cruz, California.
Kovilj Monastery.
Stork in Arkanj
Arkanj

A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage), coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

- Biocoenosis

It is a complex of marshes and forest ecosystems (4,840 ha) with numerous biocoenoses integrated into a functional whole.

- Kovilj
A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food web.
Portrait by Ernst Hildebrand (1895)
The side of a tide pool showing sea stars (Dermasterias), sea anemones (Anthopleura) and sea sponges in Santa Cruz, California.

A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage), coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

- Biocoenosis

More importantly, he was first to describe in detail the interactions between the different organisms in the ecosystem of the oyster bank, coining the term "biocenose".

- Karl Möbius
Approximate area of the Dalmatian Hinterland.
Trilj
The extent of the Kingdom of Dalmatia (blue) which existed within Austria-Hungary until 1918, on a map of modern-day Croatia and Montenegro
The ancient core of the city of Split, the largest city in Dalmatia, built in and around the Palace of Emperor Diocletian
Rocky beach at Brač island (Croatia), in the Adriatic Sea, during the summer
The historic core of the city of Dubrovnik, in southern Dalmatia
Province of Dalmatia during the Roman Empire
Late Roman provinces
Kingdom of Croatia during the rule of Peter Krešimir IV
Croatia after the Treaty of Zadar
An engraving of the seaward walls of the city of Split by Robert Adam, 1764. The walls were originally built for the Roman Diocletian's Palace.
Map of the Republic of Ragusa, dated 1678
Ottoman Bosnia at its peak territorial extent just before the Morean War in 1684
Dalmatian possessions of the Republic of Venice in 1797
Map of Dalmatia, Croatia, and Sclavonia (Slavonia). Engraved by Weller for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge under the Supervision of Charles Knight, dated January 1, 1852. Dalmatia is the area detailed in the smaller map annexed map on the right.
Austrian linguistic map from 1896. In green the areas where Slavs were the majority of the population, in orange the areas where Istrian Italians and Dalmatian Italians were the majority of the population. The boundaries of Venetian Dalmatia in 1797 are delimited with blue dots.
The Seagull Wings monument in Podgora, dedicated to the fallen sailors of the Yugoslav Partisan Navy

The Dalmatian Hinterland (Dalmatinska zagora; La Morlacca or Zagora dalmata) is the southern inland hinterland in the historical Croatian region of Dalmatia.

- Dalmatian Hinterland

The Dalmatian Hinterland ranges in width from fifty kilometres in the north, to just a few kilometres in the south; it is mostly covered by the rugged Dinaric Alps.

- Dalmatia
A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food web.
Julia Margaret Cameron’s portrait of Darwin
The side of a tide pool showing sea stars (Dermasterias), sea anemones (Anthopleura) and sea sponges in Santa Cruz, California.
The Indiana Dunes on Lake Michigan, which Cowles referred to in his development of his theories of ecological succession.

A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage), coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

- Biocoenosis

Alexander von Humboldt and Karl Möbius then contributed with the notion of biocoenosis.

- History of ecology
A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food web.
The formation of complex symmetrical and fractal patterns in snowflakes exemplifies emergence in a physical system.
The side of a tide pool showing sea stars (Dermasterias), sea anemones (Anthopleura) and sea sponges in Santa Cruz, California.
A termite "cathedral" mound produced by a termite colony offers a classic example of emergence in nature
Ripple patterns in a sand dune created by wind or water are an example of an emergent structure in nature.
Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland is an example of a complex emergent structure.
Water crystals forming on glass demonstrate an emergent, fractal process occurring under appropriate conditions of temperature and humidity.
Traffic patterns in cities can be seen as an example of spontaneous order

A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage), coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

- Biocoenosis

At the highest level, all the biological communities in the world form the biosphere, where its human participants form societies, and the complex interactions of meta-social systems such as the stock market.

- Emergence
Columbia Records co-president Rick Rubin, known for his "stripped-down" sound and unorthodox approach in the studio, was one of the major producers for the album.
Adele performing "Someone like You" in 2011 during a concert in Seattle, Washington.
Adele became the first UK female to have three number one songs from the same album and have 3 top 10 songs in the same week on Billboard Hot 100.

"Rolling in the Deep" is a song recorded by English singer-songwriter Adele for her second studio album, 21 (2011).

- Rolling in the Deep

In addition, three of the five singles released in its promotion – "Rolling in the Deep", "Someone like You" and "Set Fire to the Rain" – became international number-one songs, while "Rumour Has It" charted in the top 20 in countries across Europe and North America.

- 21 (Adele album)
Jill Stein in March 2016
From 2001 to 2009, the show was located in the DCTV firehouse building (a converted firehouse) in New York City's Chinatown.
Stein at a protest against coal-powered energy production
The Democracy Now! audio podcast cover artwork
Jill Stein announcing her candidacy for governor in February 2010
Jill Stein speaking at Occupy Wall Street, September 27, 2011
Stein with Jon Wiener, The Nation writer and host of the political podcast Start Making Sense in 2016
Jill Stein's presidential campaign logo, 2016

On June 22, she formally announced her candidacy in a live interview with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! After former Ohio state senator Nina Turner reportedly declined to be her running mate, Stein chose human rights activist Ajamu Baraka on August 1, 2016.

- Jill Stein

An arrest warrant was reportedly also issued for Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein and her running mate, Ajamu Baraka.

- Democracy Now!
A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food web.
The Earth has many diverse ecosystems and ecologicalsystem diversity. These are NASA composite images of the Earth: 2001 (left), 2002 (right), titled The Blue Marble.
The side of a tide pool showing sea stars (Dermasterias), sea anemones (Anthopleura) and sea sponges in Santa Cruz, California.

A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage), coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

- Biocoenosis

Ecological diversity can also take into account the variation in the complexity of a biological community, including the number of different niches, the number of and other ecological processes.

- Ecosystem diversity